Waste-to-Energy Industry Trends


See on Scoop.itEnergy Blog

The global market for biological and thermochemical waste-to-energy technologies is expected to reach USD 7.4 billion in 2013 and grow to USD 29.2 billion by 2022. Incineration, with energy recovery, is the most common waste-to-energy method employed worldwide. 

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Currently, the European nations are recognized as global leaders of waste-to-energy movement. They are followed behind by the Asia Pacific region and North America respectively.

See on www.bioenergyconsult.com

Causes of Climate Variability


See on Scoop.itFostering Sustainable Development

Earth’s climate has always been affected by a range of natural factors. It is known to have changed significantly during recorded history, even before gaseous emissions from human activity could ha…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

There is a complex interaction between the two components of climate; the climate variation and change in atmospheric and/or the oceanic circulation pattern. These interactions result in shift in the temperature and precipitation probability distribution functions (PDFs) towards a wetter/drier/warmer/cooler conditions.

See on www.cleantechloops.com

Solid Waste Management Situation in Morocco


See on Scoop.itWaste Waste Everywhere

Solid waste management is one of the major environmental problems threatening the Mediterranean Kingdom of Morocco. More than 5 million tons of solid waste is generated across the country with annu…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

The proper disposal of municipal solid waste in Morocco is exemplified by major deficiencies such as lack of proper infrastructure and suitable funding in areas outside of major cities. 

See on www.ecomena.org

Composting for Beginners


See on Scoop.itRenewables

Composting can be categorized into different categories depending on the nature of decomposition process. The three major segments of composting are anaerobic composting, aerobic composting, and vermicomposting.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Aerobic composting is the process by which organic wastes are converted into compost or manure in presence of air. In this process, aerobic microorganisms break down organic matter and produce carbon dioxide, ammonia, water, heat and humus, the relatively stable organic end-product. Although aerobic composting may produce intermediate compounds such as organic acids, aerobic microorganisms decompose them further.

See on www.bioenergyconsult.com

A Case for Biomass Energy


See on Scoop.itRenewables

Biomass energy has rapidly become a vital part of the global renewable energy mix and account for an ever-growing share of electric capacity added worldwide.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Bioenergy systems offer significant possibilities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions due to their immense potential to replace fossil fuels in energy production. Biomass reduces emissions and enhances carbon sequestration since short-rotation crops or forests established on abandoned agricultural land accumulate carbon in the soil.

See on www.bioenergyconsult.com

Pitfalls of Fracking


See on Scoop.itEnergy Blog

Recent events in the Europe and the United States have propelled fracking up the public and political agenda. Is the case for drilling full of holes? Despite apparent economic benefi…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Public health concerns, environmental issues, geomechanical risks, groundwater contamination, air pollution and waste management are some of the issues that are coming under increasing public scrutiny.  

See on www.ecomena.org

Biomass Exchange and Supply Chain Management


See on Scoop.itRenewables

The supply chain management in any biomass project is a big management conundrum. The complexity deepens owing to the large number of stages which encompass the entire biomass value chain.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Biomass Exchange is an attractive solution to different problems afflicting biomass project, at the same time providing the investors and entrepreneurs with a multi-million dollar opportunity. Although such a concept has been in existence in the developed world for a long time now, it has not witnessed many entrepreneurial ventures in developing nations where the need to strengthen the biomass supply chain becomes even more necessary.

See on www.bioenergyconsult.com

Supply Chain in Biomass Projects


See on Scoop.itRenewables

Supply chain management in any biomass based project is nothing less than a big management conundrum. The complexity deepens owing to the large number of stages which encompass the entire biomass value chain. It starts right from the resource harvesting and goes on to include the resource collection, processing, storage and eventually its transportation to the point of ultimate utilization.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Although most of the problems discussed above, are issues inherently associated with the usage of biomass resources, they can be curtailed to a larger extent by strengthening the most important loophole in such projects – The Biomass Resource Supply Chain.

See on www.bioenergyconsult.com

Upcycling – An Alternative to Recycling


See on Scoop.itWaste Waste Everywhere

Upcycling is different from Recycling. Recycling is the process of changing discarded materials into new products to prevent waste.  Upcycling is the practice of converting waste materials or usele…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

reatment of aluminum cans is the closest to a true upcycling model. These containers can be melted down and made into brand new cans, and in the process save over 90% of the energy required to make brand new cans from scratch. This cycle can be repeated forever, reducing energy consumption and effectively removing aluminum from the waste stream.

See on www.cleantechloops.com

Recycling of EPS Foam


See on Scoop.itWaste Waste Everywhere

EPS foam is a highly popular plastic packaging material which finds wide application in packaging of food items, electronic goods, electrical appliances, furniture etc due to its excellent insulating and protective properties.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

The cost of transporting bulky polystyrene waste discourages recyclers from recycling it.  Organizations that receive a large amount of EPS foam (especially in packaging) can invest in a compactor that will reduce the volume of the products. Recyclers will pay more for the compacted product so the investment can be recovered relatively easier.

See on www.bioenergyconsult.com

Food for thought


Salman Zafar:

The next time you are going to waste food, think of that homeless child that will be looking for it in the trash in the cold, harsh winter…

Originally posted on mahammasood:

Salaam and greetings everyone!

This Friday I am looking forward to being in Cambridge and praying behind Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad for my Friday prayers in sha Allah (excitement personified!!) :-D

I hope you all are doing very well and making plans to enjoying your upcoming weekend. Last night, I was thinking, weekends are also a blessing in disguise right? : ) A rest, a break from the norm, spending quality time with family, elongating your ibadah too perhaps?

So there are so many topics that I have thought of putting forward in the coming weeks but feel like I am drowning in my own inspirations. Today I was like even if I send something out just before midnight, I must, otherwise I would just lose out on not sending out anything at all.

Recently I have been having issues controlling my diet and discipline towards over eating (think – nafs/sloth/gluttony desires).

Last night, I was watching a YouTube video about the slums in India and kids digging in to trash dumps to find…

View original 743 more words

A Glance at Upcycling


See on Scoop.itFostering Sustainable Development

Upcycling is different from Recycling. Recycling is the process of changing discarded materials into new products to prevent waste.  Upcycling is the practice of converting waste materials or usele…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Treatment of aluminum cans is the closest to a true upcycling model. These containers can be melted down and made into brand new cans, and in the process save over 90% of the energy required to make brand new cans from scratch. This cycle can be repeated forever, reducing energy consumption and effectively removing aluminum from the waste stream.

See on www.cleantechloops.com

Jatropha in the Middle East


See on Scoop.itEnergy Blog

Jatropha can be successfully grown in arid regions of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) for biodiesel production. These energy crops are highly useful in preventing soil erosion and shifting of sand-dunes. 

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Jatropha is already grown at limited scale in some Middle East countries, especially Egypt,  and tremendous potential exists for its commercial exploitation.

See on www.ecomena.org

The 10 Cities That Are Leading The Way In Urban Sustainability


Salman Zafar:

Take all of the best qualities of these municipalities–effective road management, cap and trade, sustainable energy, excellent public transportation, a zero waste program, and so on–and you have an urbanist’s dream city.

Originally posted on Master in Regenerating Intermediate Landscapes:

Cities are the laboratories where the most innovative ideas for surviving in the future can be tested. These 10–from New York to Tokyo to Bogota–were just awarded City Climate Leadership Awards for their work.

With a few exceptions, national governments aren’t going to make a big dent in climate change and associated environmental problems. They’re too big, slow, and in many cases, don’t even want to acknowledge a problem that’s so politically inconvenient. Over the past half decade or so, it has become increasingly apparent that cities are leading the way–and ultimately, have the greatest chance at boosting our chances for survival in the face of declining resources and rising seas.

This week, Siemens and C40 (the Cities Climate Leadership Group), announced the 10 winners of the inaugural City Climate Leadership Awards, given to municipalities around the world that have demonstrated “excellence in urban sustainability and leadership in the fight…

View original 640 more words

Impact of Transportation on Overall Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Food Waste Recovery Systems


Salman Zafar:

571 miles is approximately the additional one way transit (collection and long haul) before waste to energy and composting are of equal value from a greenhouse gas emissions perspective.

Originally posted on Resource Strategies Blog:

Q: How many additional miles can a ton of food waste that will ultimately be composted travel before there is no longer a net greenhouse gas emissions reduction compared to the existing MSW disposal option?

A: 571 miles is approximately the additional one way transit (collection and long haul) before waste to energy and composting are of equal value from a greenhouse gas emissions perspective.

Municipalities considering implementing organics recovery programs often ask about the greenhouse gas emissions of composting, waste to energy, and landfill and generally how to think about trade-offs in transportation distances between the options.

To help with understanding the relative magnitude of the emissions, here’s a back of the envelope calculation along with some additional variables to keep in mind should your municipality or business be wrestling with the same questions.

Based on national averages, U.S. EPA’s Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery have developed…

View original 438 more words

Simplifying Global Warming


See on Scoop.itFostering Sustainable Development

Everybody is worried about climate change. It’s just that a fair proportion is convinced it is a natural phenomenon, nothing to do with human activities. When a significant number of individuals se…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Global warming means something to big businesses because it is forced to comply by governments. But how many do you know that are voluntarily interested and doing something? It means little to smaller enterprises (SMEs) because they are not forced to comply and have more than enough other things to think about. It means even less to the general public because it has little relevance to actions that are available to them.

See on www.cleantechloops.com

Solar Energy Prospects in Hawaii


See on Scoop.itRenewables

For the longest time now, Hawaii has been one of the most robust markets for solar panel installations in the US. Hawaiian residents have reason to turn to solar power as enthusiastically as they h…

See on www.cleantechloops.com

Strategic Environmental Assessment and Sustainable Development


See on Scoop.itFostering Sustainable Development

Seeking to find its own recipe for sustainability planning, Jordan is piloting Strategic Environmental Assessment as a tool for planning and managing development zones or special economic areas. St…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

The SEA process exists to ensure the early integration of environmental considerations into the preparation and adoption of Master Plans and development programs with a view to promoting sustainable development. 

See on www.ecomena.org

Biomass Energy in Vietnam


See on Scoop.itRenewables

Being an agricultural country, Vietnam has very good biomass energy potential. Agricultural wastes are most abundant in the Mekong Delta region with approximately 50% of the amount of the whole country and Red River Delta with 15%. Major biomass resources includes rice husk from paddy milling stations, bagasse from sugar factories, coffee husk from coffee processing plants

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Nearly 40 bagasse-based biomass power plants have been developed with a total designed capacity of 150 MW but they are still unable to connect with the national grid due to current low power prices. Five cogeneration systems selling extra electricity to national grid at average price of 4UScents/kWh.

See on www.bioenergyconsult.com

Sweden tops new ranking of countries best equipped.


Salman Zafar:

The report takes into account 17 factors and have applied this knowledge to country level analysis, ultimately finding that Sweden is the most sustainable country on Earth–meaning it’s best equipped for the future.

Originally posted on :

A new report ranks the world’s countries not on their economic indicators, but on their ability to “safeguard the needs of its future generations.” We normally judge which countries are “doing best” by looking at economic growth–a realm in which places like China and India thrive, despite their environmental and other problems. A more grounded approach might look at a range of factors, from a country’s social factors such as investments in education, governance factors such as aging policies, energy mix to its democracy. Such sustainability factors, country’s strengths and weaknesses, are  frequently overlooked by rating agencies.

That’s what a new report (measuring country intangibles) from investment advisors RobecoSAM does, and the results are quite different from the standard narrative. Robeco and RobecoSAM have worked together to develop a comprehensive and systematic ESG ranking framework for countries. By focusing on selected ESG factors such as aging, competitiveness and environmental risks – which are long term in nature.

The report takes into account 17 factors and have…

View original 136 more words

Solid Waste Management in Iraq


See on Scoop.itWaste Waste Everywhere

Iraq is estimated to produce 31,000 tons of solid waste every day with per capita waste generation exceeding 1.4 kg per day. Baghdad alone produces more than 1.5 million tons of solid wastes each year.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Rapid increase in waste generation production is putting tremendous strain on Iraqi waste handling infrastructure which have heavily damaged after decades of conflict and mismanagement. In the absence of modern and efficient waste handling and disposal infrastructure most of the wastes are disposed in unregulated landfills across Iraq, with little or no concern for both human health and environment.

See on www.ecomena.org

Peat as Energy Resource


See on Scoop.itEnergy Blog

Peat is an accumulation of partially decayed vegetation. One of the most common components is Sphagnum moss, although many other plants can contribute. Peat forms in wetland conditions, where flood…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Peat has industrial importance as a fuel in some countries, such as Ireland and Finland, where it is harvested on an industrial scale. In many countries, including Ireland and Scotland, where trees are often scarce, peat is traditionally used for cooking and domestic heating. In Ireland, large-scale domestic and industrial peat usage is widespread.

See on www.cleantechloops.com

Waste-Free Growth Model


See on Scoop.itWaste Waste Everywhere

Growth from trashing the planet was never a clever idea and linear economics has now reached the end of the line. The ‘more is better’ economy does not need to be stimulated to grow nor…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

A switch towards waste-free growth would preserve and regenerate material value and natural capital instead of losing it, so growth would work to build the physical basis for more growth. 

See on www.ecomena.org

Challenges in PVC Recycling


See on Scoop.itWaste Waste Everywhere

When different kinds of PVC waste are fed to a mechanical recycler, the resulting product’s composition is difficult to predict, which is problematic because most PVC products, even recycled ones, require a specific PVC content.  

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

In order to produce a high-quality recylate, the feed ideally should not be mixed with other kinds of plastic and should have a uniform material composition.Material recycling is therefore more applicable for post-industrial waste than for post-consumer waste.

See on www.ecomena.org

Environmental Cleanup by Microbes


See on Scoop.itFostering Sustainable Development

Ecosystems are permanently challenged with the abundant release of toxic compounds into the environment due to a wide range of anthropogenic activities. Apparently, contamination with oil spil…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Bioremediation of polluted environment using an environmental-friendly, versatile and cost-effective technology such as microbial bioremediation will reduce the health risk, rescue the biodiversity heritage and restore the damaged ecosystem naturally. 

See on www.ecomena.org

Exploring Depletion of Sharks


See on Scoop.itWater Board

Shark species are increasingly becoming threatened because of commercial and recreational fishing pressures, the impact of non-shark fisheries on the seabed and shark prey species, and other habita…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

It is a sad reflection of our time that effective stewardship and sustainable management of the oceanic resources seem to be out of our reach.  There far too many political, parochial, cultural and economic expediency ‘blockage factors’ conspiring to prevent any significant and realistic hope for productive developments in the near future.

See on www.cleantechloops.com

Renewable Energy in Germany


See on Scoop.itRenewables

Germany has been called “the world’s first major renewable energy economy” as the country is one of the world’s most prolific users of renewable energy for power, heating, and transport.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Germany is the world’s third largest market for renewable energy investment which totalled $31billion in 2011. Sixty-five percent of investment in Germany was directed toward solar, with 29 percent ($8.5 billion) directed to wind. In addition, 700 MW of biomass capacity was added in 2011

See on www.bioenergyconsult.com

SWM Scenario in Iraq


See on Scoop.itWaste Waste Everywhere

 Iraq is estimated to produce 31,000 tons of solid waste every day with per capita waste generation exceeding 1.4 kg per day. Baghdad alone produces more than 1.5 million tons of solid wastes each year.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Rapid increase in waste generation production is putting tremendous strain on Iraqi waste handling infrastructure which have heavily damaged after decades of conflict and mismanagement. In the absence of modern and efficient waste handling and disposal infrastructure most of the wastes are disposed in unregulated landfills across Iraq, with little or no concern for both human health and environment. 

Solar-Powered Desalination for Middle East


See on Scoop.itWater Board

Conventional large-scale desalination is cost-prohibitive and energy-intensive, and not viable for poor countries in the MENA region due to increasing costs of fossil fuels. In addition, the enviro…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Seawater desalination powered by concentrated solar power offers an attractive opportunity for MENA countries to ensure affordable, sustainable and secure freshwater supply. The growing water deficit in the MENA region is fuelling regional conflicts, political instability and environmental degradation. It is expected that the energy demand for seawater desalination for urban centres and mega-cities will be met by ensuring mass deployment of CSP-powered systems across the region. 

See on www.ecomena.org

Cement from Medical Wastes


See on Scoop.itWaste Waste Everywhere

The most common cause for alarm in the medical field pertaining to waste disposal is the exposure of the worker to infectious wastes and contraction of diseases from these wastes. With the increase…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Cementatious solidification incorporates a range of materials such as gypsum, lime, and Portland cement to form slurry that will fixate medical wastes. In most cases, the cement mixture is added directly over the container holding the wastes, although direct mixture of the cement and wastes do occur. 

See on www.cleantechloops.com