How Climate Change affects Water Resources


Warmer temperatures increase the rate of evaporation of water into the atmosphere, in effect increasing the atmosphere’s capacity to “hold” water. This causes earlier and shorter runoff seasons and increases dry seasons. Increased evaporation also decreases soil moisture levels, which in turn increases the frequency of droughts, and increases the likelihood of desertification. 

Source: www.ecomena.org

Global warming is undeniable and the increase in greenhouse gas emissions will have profound climatic, environmental, and societal impacts worldwide, especially in terms of water resources. 

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Insights into Recycling of Greywater


Reusing greywater for irrigation and other non-potable water applications will help in reconnection of urban habitats to the natural water cycle, which will contribute significantly to sustainable urban development.

Source: www.ecomena.org

Reuse of greywater can help in substituting precious drinking water in applications which do not need drinking water quality such as industrial, irrigation, toilet flushing and laundry washing. This will, in turn, reduce freshwater consumption, apart from wastewater generation. 

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Reducing the Impact of Sand and Dust Storms


Sand and dust storms cause significant negative impacts on society, economy and environment at local, regional and global scale.  There are three key factors responsible for the generation of sand and dust storms – strong wind, lack of vegetation and absence of rainfall. 

Source: www.ecomena.org

The effects of sand and dust storms can be reduced by using a number of health & safety measures and environmental control strategies. Localised small-scale dust emission due to human induced activities can be reduced by using temporary mechanical methods such as concrete barrier, mulching, tree buffer etc. 

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Insights into Sand and Dust Storms


Sand and dust storms are regular occurrences around the world and more common in arid and semi-arid regions. Dust storms play an important role in global dust cycle, and can alter the radiative balance. It can damage agricultural crops and retard plant growth and alter the life cycle of the marine benthic organisms

Source: www.ecomena.org

Sand and dust storm can cause negative impacts on three pillars of sustainability; society, economy and environment. As the dust cloud rises, it reduces the horizontal visibility. Low visibility can affect human life in many ways. The fine suspended particles also contain contaminants, bacteria, pollens, which cause negative health impacts such as allergies and respiratory diseases. 

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Energy-from-Waste in Middle East


There are several energy-from-waste initiatives already underway in the region. Qatar was the first GCC country to implement a EfW programme and currently generates over 30MW of electricity from its Domestic Solid Waste Management Center (DSWMC) located at Messeid (Doha). Saudi Arabia and the UAE have both stated that they have WtE production capacity targets of 100MW. Bahrain, Kuwait and Oman are also seriously considering energy-from-waste as a means to tackle the worsening waste management problem.

Source: www.bioenergyconsult.com

New technologies naturally take time to become established as their efficiency versus cost ratios are analysed. However, it is becoming increasingly clearer that energy-from-wastes is a viable and efficient method for solid waste management and generation of alternative energy in the Middle East.

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Climate Change Initiatives in Qatar


Qatar’s environmental records have always been in news, of course for the negative ones, but it has always strived to work towards reduction of GHGs emissions. Qatar is already doing plen…

Source: www.ecomena.org

It is heartening to see that Qatar has recognized the importance of renewable energy and sustainability and its fight for reducing its ecological footprint. A cheaper, greener, sustainable and more reliable energy future for Qatar could be within reach.

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Understanding Qatar’s Ecological Footprint


Qatar’s environmental impact remains worryingly high. The country’s per capita ecological footprint is now the second highest in the world, as another Gulf state, Kuwait, has overtaken it to become the worst offender of the 152 countries that were measured

Source: www.ecomena.org

Grass-root level environmental education, removal of subsidies on water and energy, sustainable waste management practices, effective laws, awareness programs and mandatory stakeholder participation are some of the measures that may improve the environmental scenario in Qatar.

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