Bottled Water – Bane for the Environment


Bottled water is widely used by people from all walks of life and is considered to be convenient and safer than tap water. A person on an average drinks around 2.0 liters of water a day and may consume 4-6 plastic bottles per day. 

Source: www.ecomena.org

Water bottles manufacturing, transportation, distribution and again collection and disposal after its use create enormous pollution in terms of trash generation, global warming and air pollution. The transportation of bottled water from its source to stores alone releases thousands of tons of carbon dioxide.

See on Scoop.itWaste Waste Everywhere

Guide to an Eco-Friendly Ramadan


The month of Ramadan is a golden opportunity to consider making a shift towards a ‘green lifestyle’ that is environmental friendly, non-polluting, non-wasteful and aim toward saving of natural resources. The green lifestyle means improving the quality of life and achieving sustainable development.

Source: www.ecomena.org

Any mismanagement of our precious resources will be having irreversible impacts on our ecology. Let us make concerted effort to encourage and embrace “green”  and ecofriendly practices, especially during Ramadan.

Minimizing Food Waste in Ramadan


Over the period of years, the society and people have become more wasteful due to rise in income, living standards, consumerism and affordability. But affording does not mean that wastage should increase as it is contrary to the Islamic principles of sustainability.

Source: www.ecomena.org

We need to change our attitude of not laying the table with more food than people can eat. This is not hospitality and welcoming the guests. We need to develop better food habits and respect for the Mother Nature. The problem of food wastage lies in socio-cultural sensitization and behavioral change.

Unending Benefits of Wastewater Treatment Plants


See on Scoop.itWater Board

The wastewater treatment process does not only produce clean reusable water, but also has the potential to produce various other benefits. It has the potential to reduce a country’s waste production, to produce energy through methane harvesting, and the potential to produce natural fertilizer from the waste collected through the process.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Wastewater treatment presents a sustainable short-term and long-term solution to water scarcity. Wastewater treatment is a sustainable short and long-term solution to the world’s water crisis, which will only increase as the world population increases.

See on www.ecomena.org

Impact of Climate Change on Public Health


See on Scoop.itFostering Sustainable Development

Anthropogenic climatic change is adversely affecting our health which is becoming more severe with each passing year. As per conservative estimates, climate change causes more than 150,000 addition…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

The changing climate is affecting the basic requirements for maintaining health — including clean air. Changing wind patterns contributes to transfer of dust, pollen, bacteria, mold, allergens cause’s respiratory infections and airborne diseases. Intense heat is expected to increase this burden due to the continued rising in temperature. 

See on www.ecomena.org

Impact of Anthropogenic Emissions on Ecosystems


See on Scoop.itFostering Sustainable Development

Anthropogenic climate change is hindering a wide variety of organisms, their genetics and species’ habitats – in short, biodiversity. The accelerated pace of human development and …

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Anthropogenic climate change has started affecting different organisms in different ecosystems. The IPCC’s 2007 calculations estimated that greenhouse gas emissions would need to be reduced by at least 80% by 2050 to avoid the devastating impacts of climate change. Since humans have created this problem, it is our moral responsibility to solve it. 

See on www.ecomena.org

Analysis of Red-Dead Sea Water Conveyance Project


See on Scoop.itWater Board

In theory, Red-Dead Sea Water Conveyance Project seems to be a sound plan that will not only help replenish the Dead Sea and restore the fragile ecosystem to its old healthy status, but also provide water to neighbouring countries. However, major environmental concerns have been raised about Red-Dead Sea Water Conveyance Project, with environmentalists indicating that it would provide only about a 10th of the volume of water required to stabilise the Dead Sea, while also threatening its unique characteristics. 

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Due to the high environmental risk that would be taken in order to implement such a project, it would be wise to consider alternative options. The first alternative would be to release water from the Sea of Galilee to lower the Jordan River and eventually into the Dead Sea. 

See on www.ecomena.org