Renewable Energy in Germany


See on Scoop.itRenewables

Germany has been called “the world’s first major renewable energy economy” as the country is one of the world’s most prolific users of renewable energy for power, heating, and transport.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Germany is the world’s third largest market for renewable energy investment which totalled $31billion in 2011. Sixty-five percent of investment in Germany was directed toward solar, with 29 percent ($8.5 billion) directed to wind. In addition, 700 MW of biomass capacity was added in 2011

See on www.bioenergyconsult.com

Solar-Powered Desalination for Middle East


See on Scoop.itWater Board

Conventional large-scale desalination is cost-prohibitive and energy-intensive, and not viable for poor countries in the MENA region due to increasing costs of fossil fuels. In addition, the enviro…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Seawater desalination powered by concentrated solar power offers an attractive opportunity for MENA countries to ensure affordable, sustainable and secure freshwater supply. The growing water deficit in the MENA region is fuelling regional conflicts, political instability and environmental degradation. It is expected that the energy demand for seawater desalination for urban centres and mega-cities will be met by ensuring mass deployment of CSP-powered systems across the region. 

See on www.ecomena.org

Which Countries Use the Most Renewable Energy? By Percentage


Salman Zafar:

Germany has become the world’s largest producer of solar power, while diversifying their energy portfolio with large portions of wind and biomass electricity as well. As of 2011, Germany generated roughly 20% of their electricity from non-hydro renewable energy, 8% from wind, 8% from biomass, and 3% from solar. Since then, the country has expanded solar production to account for close to 10% of their average annual electricity needs!

Originally posted on rethink. renew. revive.:

Last week I posted a list of the 5 Countries that produce the most renewable energy.  Not suprisingly, the countries on the list tended to be large countries that also consumed the highest amounts of electricity.  In fact, three of the countries on the list were also in the top 5 Coal consumers.

While it is definately worth recognizing those countries for increasing the amount of renewable electricity generation in their country and worldwide, I thought (and readers agreed) that we should take a look at which countries produce the largest portion of their electricity from renewable sources.  In this way, we can see which countries have invested the most in setting up a sustainable energy future, regardless of size.  So, with that I give you the Top 5 Renewable Energy Producer’s by Percentage:

note:  This ranking was tough to determine, based on several different sources, with different classifications…

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Exploring Solar Power in Morocco


See on Scoop.itRenewables

The Moroccan Solar Plan is regarded as a milestone on the country’s path towards a secure and sustainable energy supply which is clean, green and affordable. The world’s largest and most ambitious solar energy plan with investment of USD 9billion is meant to generate 2,000 MW of solar power by the year 2020 by building mega-scale solar power projects at five locations

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

The first plant, under the Moroccan Solar Plan, will be commissioned in 2014, and the entire project is expected to be complete in 2019. Once completed, the solar project is expected to provide almost one-fifth of Morocco’s annual electricity generation. Morocco, the only African country to have a power cable link to Europe, is also a key player in Mediterranean Solar Plan and Desertec Industrial Initiative. 

See on www.cleantechloops.com

Renewable Energy Prospects in GCC


See on Scoop.itRenewables

The clamor for renewable energy has increased significantly in the GCC in recent years due to concerns regarding global warming and depletion of fossil fuels. Regional countries whose environments are extremely intensive in terms of the carbon emissions and energy usage, like the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, have taken concrete steps and developed strategies to produce clean energy on large-scale to lower carbon footprint and foster sustainable development.

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Large-scale investments and new sustainable development projects are expected to transform GCC  into the ultimate destination for clean energy technologies which will not only lower carbon footprint of the region but also reduce the cost of solar, wind and other renewable energy systems. 

See on www.cleantechloops.com

Solar-Powered Desalination in Middle East


See on Scoop.itWater Board

Conventional large-scale desalination is cost-prohibitive and energy-intensive, and not viable for poor countries in the MENA region due to increasing costs of fossil fuels. In addition, the enviro…

Salman Zafar‘s insight:

Seawater desalination powered by concentrated solar power offers an attractive opportunity for Middle East countries to ensure affordable, sustainable and secure freshwater supply. The growing water deficit in the region is fuelling regional conflicts, political instability and environmental degradation. 

See on www.ecomena.org

Why should we believe in renewable energy?


Salman Zafar:

Renewable energy is at a starting point, it has problems and is expensive but when we ask WHY do we believe in renewable energy and the facts lead us to answers like: ”Because it brings economic value, because it provides better jobs, because it makes us independent and because it makes the world a better place where we can actually live and not melt” maybe this are things that are worth paying extra for.

Originally posted on Re Construct Romania:

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  A very intense debate about the future of renewable energy in Romania has started at the beginning of this year, with numerous voices claiming that it only brings cost not value to our country.

  Before we decide if renewable energy is good or bad let’s first see WHY the EU ( European Union) and IEA (International Energy Association) care so much about this type of energy?

  So WHY are these organizations promoting renewable energy an WHY should we believe in it ?

  1. Does it bring value to the economy?

   According to the debaters from our country it seems that renewable energy is only increasing the cost of energy, so economic growth is not the reason, but IEA seems to disagree, so let’s have a look at some facts about energy subsidies.

   IEA (International Energy Agency) in the WORLD ENERGY OUTLOOK 2011 FACTSHEET :

 ” Fossil-fuel consumption subsidies worldwide amounted to $409 billion…

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