Delivering Green: Three Case Studies in Low-Carbon Logistics

Logistics is a leading source of carbon. Nearly 6 percent of the greenhouse gases generated by humans come from the flow of products to consumers. Reducing these emissions takes more than setting goals: it requires clear, measurable initiatives that hit sustainability targets while delivering lower costs and higher service levels.

Supply Chain @ MIT

Supply chain sustainability projects are often sold on the argument that going green makes good business sense. Here are three case studies that offer clear, irrefutable evidence that sustainability and profitability can be compatible in the supply chain domain.

Logistics is a leading source of carbon. Nearly 6 percent of the greenhouse gases generated by humans come from the flow of products to consumers. Reducing these emissions takes more than setting goals; it requires clear, measurable initiatives that hit sustainability targets while delivering lower costs and higher service levels.

Sponsored by Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), MIT CTL worked alongside three US companies to help them quantify the carbon footprint of some of their logistics initiatives. The goal was to document the projects, and illustrate to other companies that it is possible to reduce cost and become more environmentally friendly. Here is a summary of each project.

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